Design & Prepress

What resolution should my images be?
If you're printing brochures, postcards or other marketing materials your placed images should be 300 dpi. If you're printing banners or other large format items your image resolution can be 120 dpi at full scale.

What are Pantone spot colours?
A spot colour is any colour generated by an ink (pure or mixed) that is printed in a single run. The Pantone matching system is a standardized colour reproduction system that allows different manufacturers in different locations to refer to a Pantone swatch to make sure spot colours match.

What are CMYK process colours?
The CMYK process is a method of printing colour by using four inks-cyan, magenta, yellow, and black. The vast majority of the world's full colour printed material is produced using the CMYK process, and there is a special subset of Pantone colours that can be reproduced using CMYK.

What are crop marks?
Crop marks define where the artwork is trimmed after it is printed. Crop marks can be generated automatically by most design and layout programs. If you would like an expanded explanation with pictures and examples you can visit our blog article titled 'What are crop marks and bleeds?'

What are bleeds?
Any colour or picture that touches the edge of the finished piece is said to bleed. Due to the inconsistencies in the cutting and printing process printers require a 1/8" bleed to ensure that after trimming there is no white showing. For example a 4"x6" post card with images that touch the finished edge should be laid out at 4.25" x 6.25" and the printer will then trim it to 4" x 6". If you would like an expanded explanation with pictures and examples you can visit our blog article titled 'What are crop marks and bleeds?'

What type of proofs do you supply?
Our standard proof is a PDF proof supplied to your email address. For an additional charge we can supply hard copy ink jet proofs for CMYK process print jobs.

Why do the colours on my final product look different than the colours on my screen?
Printers and monitors produce colours in different ways. Monitors use RGB colour and most printers use CMYK colour. You can view your artwork on different monitors and it will also vary. Unfortunately you can't rely on your monitor as an accurate representation of the final colour.